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  • penguin 18:10 on 2018-04-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , gitlab   

    GitLab spot runners & Puppet 

    We are on AWS with GitLab. For ease of use, and because our build hosts degenerate for some reason (network issues), we decided to use spot instances with GitLab.

    The journey was all but easy. Here’s why.

    GitLab Runner configuration complaints

    First: The process

    To configure GitLab runner, you have to …

    • install GitLab,
    • write down the runner registration token,
    • start a runner,
    • manually a registration command using above token.

    That registration command will then modify the config file of the runner. That is important because you can’t just write a static, read-only config file and start the runner. This is not possible for two reasons:

    • when you execute the registration command, the runner wants to modify the config file to add yet another token (its “personal” token, not the general registration secret), so it must not be read-only
    • the runner has to be registered, so just starting it will do … nothing.

    That is in my eyes a huge design flaw, which undoubtedly has its reasons, but it still – sorry – sucks IMHO.

    Second: The configuration

    You can configure pretty much everything in the config file. But once the runner registers, the registration process for some reason appends a completely new config to any existing config file, so that … the state is weird. It works, but it looks fucked, and feels fucked.

    You can also set all configuration file entries using the gitlab-runner register  command. Well, not all: The global parameters (like, for example, log_level  or concurrent ) cannot be set. Those have to be in a pre-existing config file, so you need both – the file and the registration command, which will look super ugly in a very short time.

    Especially if you still use Puppet to manage the runners, cause then you just can’t just restart the runner once the config file changes. Because it will always change, because of above reasons.

    Third: The AWS permission documentation

    Another thing is that the list of AWS permissions the runner needs in order to create spot instances is nowhere to be found. Hint: EC2FullAccess  and S3FullAccess is not enough. We are using admin permissions right now, until we figured it out. Not nice.

    Our solution

    For this we’re still using Puppet (our K8S migration is still ongoing), and our solution so far looks like this:

    • Create a config file with puppet next to the designated config file location,
      • containing only global parameters.
      • The file has a puppet hook which triggers an exec that deletes the “final” config file if the puppet-created one has changed.
    • Start the GitLab runner.
    • Perform a “docker exec” which registers the runner in GitLab.
      • The “unless” contains a check that skips execution if the final config file is present.
      • The register  command sets all configuration values except the global ones. Like said above, the command appends all non-global config settings to any existing config file.

    Some code

    Does this look ugly? You bet.

    Should this be a puppet module? Most probably.

    Did I foresee this? Nope.

    Am I completely fed up? Yes.

    Is this stuff I want to do? No.

    Does it work?

    Yes (at least … 🙂 )

    Remarks

    If you wander what all those create::THING  entries are – it’s this:

    We have an awful lot of those, cause then we can do a lot of stuff in the config YAMLs and don’t need to go in puppet DSL code.

     
  • penguin 08:07 on 2018-02-23 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: font,   

    Ugly ligatures in Linux 

    Unfortunately boohomil went off grid. I still haven’t replicated his config fully. And it still sucks.

    One more step was fixing those super-ugly ligatures in Linux. Works at least in LibreOffice (just restart the app to see changes).

     
  • penguin 08:55 on 2018-02-01 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: commandline,   

    crontab and nano 

    Ever used update-alternatives to switch everything to vim and … crontab -e still used nano?

    Well, I had this. I found the answer:

     

     
  • penguin 18:13 on 2017-10-17 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: jira,   

    JIRA and Python 

    I really came to hating JIRA with a passion. And now I have to create about 350 tickets.

    Naturally I don’t do this by hand. But using the JIRA API is kind of … hard, there is a Python library, but usage is rather sparsely documented, and this whole thing is just annoying as hell.

    Although when you did it, it’s quite simple. Here’s an example of how to create a ticket with due date and estimate set from a CSV file:

    So simple.

     
    • Mika 14:40 on 2017-12-20 Permalink | Reply

      Hi Axel, hast Du auch einen Twitter Account, in dem Du über neue Updates aus Deinem Blog informierst, oder ist der RSS Feed meine (einzige?) Anlaufstelle?

      • penguin 18:29 on 2017-12-27 Permalink | Reply

        Hey Mika, gute Idee eigentlich 🙂 . Aktuell ist es nur RSS. Ich könnte allerdings einen Twitter-Feed dafür einrichten … .
        Freut mich allerdings dass du auf dem Laufenden bleiben möchtest 😀 . Und sorry wegen der langen Antwortzeit – ich war 4 Wochen im Urlaub. Dringend notwendig.

  • penguin 12:33 on 2017-04-26 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    jq makes AWS “describe-instances” actually useful 

    Just so I don’t forget 🙂

     

     
  • penguin 16:14 on 2017-04-13 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , elastic beanstalk   

    Elastic Beanstalk with Docker using Terraform 

    I just investigate AWS Elastic Beanstalk. And I want to use terraform for this. This is what I’ve done, and how I’ve got it running. I basically do this because the docs for this are either super-long (and are still missing critical points) or super-short (and are also missing critical points), at least what I’ve found.

    This should get you up and running in very little time. You can also get all the code from a demo github repository.

    General principles

    The Architectural Overview is a good page to read to get an idea of what you’re about to do. It’s not that long.

    In short, Elastic Beanstalk runs a version of an application in an environment. So the process is: Declaring an application, defining a couple of versions and environments, and then combine one specific version with one specific environment of an app to create an actually running deployment.

    The environment is just a set of hosts configured in a special way (autoscaling & triggers, subnets, roles, etc.), whereas the application version is the info about how to deploy the containers on that environment (ports, env variables, etc.). Naturally, you think of having a DEV environment which runs “latest”, and a PROD environment which runs “stable” or so. Go crazy.

    Prerequisites & Preparation

    For the example here you need a couple of things & facts:

    • An AWS account
    • In that account, you need:
      • an S3 bucket to save your app versions
      • a VPC ID
      • subnet IDs for the instance networks
      • an IAM roles for the hosts
      • an IAM service roles elastic beanstalk. (see bottom for how to create that)
    • Terraform 🙂
    • The aws command line client

    Get started

    The files in the repository have way more parameters, but this is the basic set which should get you running (I tried once, then added all that stuff). The main.tf  file below will create the application and an environment associated with it.

    If you run this, at least one host and one ELB should appear in the defined subnets. Still, this is an empty environment, there’s no app running in it. If if you ask yourself, “where’s the version he talked about?” – well, it’s not in there. We didn’t create one yet. This is just the very basic platform you need to run a version of an app.

    In my source repo you can now just use the script app_config_create_and_upload.sh , followed by deploy.sh . You should be able to figure out how to use them, and they should work out of the box. But we’re here to explain, so this is what happens behind the scenes if you do this:

    1. create a file “ Dockerrun.aws.json ” with the information about the service (Docker image, etc.) to deploy
    2. upload that file into an S3 bucket, packed into a ZIP file (see “final notes” below)
    3. tell Elastic Beanstalk to create a new app version using the info from that file (on S3)

    That obviously was app_config_create_and_upload.sh . The next script, deploy.sh , does this:

    1. tell EBS to actually deploy that configuration using the AWS cli.

    This is the Dockerrun.aws.json  file which describes our single-container test application:

    See “final notes” for the “ContainerPort” directive.

    I also guess you know how to upload a file to S3, so I’ll skip that. If not, look in the script. The Terraform declaration to add the version to Elastic Beanstalk looks like this: (if you used my script, a file called app_version_<VERSION>.tf  was created for you automatically with pretty much this content):

    Finally, deploying this using the AWS cli:

    All done correctly, this should be it, and you should be able to access your app now under your configured address.

    Wrap up & reasoning

    My repo works, at least for me (I hope for you as well). I did not yet figure out the autoscaling, for which I didn’t have time. I will catch up in a 2nd blog post once I figured that out. First tests gave pretty weird results 🙂 .

    The reason why I did this (when I have Rancher available for me) is the auto-scaling, and the host-management. I don’t need to manage any more hosts and Docker versions and Rancher deployments just to deploy a super-simle, CPU-intensive, scaling production workload, which relies on very stable (even pretty conservative) components in that way. Also I learned something.

    Finally, after reading a lot of postings and way to much AWS docs, I am surprised how easy this thing actually is. It certainly doesnt look that way if you start reading up on it. I tried to catch the essence of the whole process in that blog post.

    Final notes & troubleshooting

    1. I have no idea what the aws_elastic_beanstalk_configuration_template  Terraform resource is for. I would like to understand it, but the documentation is rather … sparse.
    2. The solution stack name has semantic meaning. You must set something that AWS understands. This can be found out by using the following command:
      $ aws elasticbeanstalk list-available-solution-stacks 
      … or on the AWS documentation. Whatever is to your liking.
    3. If you don’t specify a security group ( aws:autoscaling:launchconfiguration  – “ SecurityGroups “) one will be created for you automatically. That might not be convenient because this means that on “terraform destroy” this group might not be destroyed automatically. (which is just a guess, I didn’t test this)
    4. The same goes for the auto scaling group scaling rules.
    5. When trying the minimal example, be extra careful when you can’t access the service after everything is there. The standard settings seem to be: Same subnet for ELB and hosts (obviously), and public ELB (with public IPv4 address). Now, placing a public-facing ELB into an internal-only subnet does not work, right? 🙂
    6. The ZIP file: According to the docs you can only upload the JSON file (or the Dockerfile file if you build the container in the process) to S3. But the docs are not extremely clear, and Terraform did not mention this. So I am using ZIPs which works just fine.
    7. The ContainerPort is always the port the applications listens on in the container, it is not the port which is opened to the outside. That always seems to be 80 (at least for single-container deployments)

    Appendix I: Create ServiceRole IAM role

    For some reason on the first test run this did not seem to be necessary. On all subsequent runs it was, though. This is the way to create this. Sorry that I couldn’t figure out how to do this with Terraform.

    • open AWS IAM console
    • click “Create new role”
    • Step 1 – select role type: choose “AWS service role”, and under that “AWS Elastic Beanstalk”
    • Step 2 – establish trust: is skipped by the wizard after this
    • Step 3 – Attach policy: Check both policies in the table (should be “AWSElasticBeanstalkEnhancedHealth”, and “AWSElasticBeanstalkService”)
    • Step 4 – Set role name and review: Enter a role name (e.g. “aws-elasticbeanstalk-service-role”), and hit “Create role”

    Now you can use (if you chose that name) “aws-elasticbeanstalk-service-role” as your ServiceRole parameter.

    Appendix II: Sources

     
  • penguin 14:45 on 2017-01-17 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , fix, pycharm,   

    PyCharm, Arch linux & Python 3.6 

    Love Python. Love PyCharm. Love Arch Linux.

    Unfortunately Arch sneakily updated Python to 3.6. Cool, new version … but hey, why don’t my debug runs in PyCharm work any more??

    Yup, pretty confusing. It seems unable to find shared python 3.5 library. Well. After some cursing, turns out the solution is pretty simple (if you know what to do):

    • get pyenv
    • use pyenv to install Python 3.5.2, but with –enable-shared option set
    • use this python version for PyCharm projects (it does not matter if it’s in a virtualenv or not)

    Like this:

    That solved it for me 🙂

    References:
     
  • penguin 13:31 on 2017-01-12 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , logging, , ops   

    Logs with docker and logstash 

    It would be nice to have all container logs from a docker cluster sent to … let’s say, an ELK stack. Right?

    Right.

    So we did:

    • on each host in the cluster, we use the GELF log driver to send all logs to a logstash instance
    • the logstash instance clones each request using type “ELK”
    • to the “ELK” clone, it adds the token for the external ELK service
    • the “ELK” clone goes out to the external ELK cluster
    • the original event goes to S3.

    Here’s how.

    (More …)

     
    • David Sanftenberg 09:30 on 2017-07-04 Permalink | Reply

      Multiline gelf filters are no longer supported in 5.x of Logstash it seems. I’m considering downgrading to 4.x for this, as we use a lot of microservices and many JSONs are logged simultaneously, really messing up our logs. Thanks for the writeup.

  • penguin 10:49 on 2017-01-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Logstash, clone filter & add_field mysteries 

    That’s a really great piece of documentation. This does not work:

    Why? Because the clone filter will not clone anything. And the documentation is super unclear on this. If you know it, you can read it – if you don’t know this, you’ll … google.

    For it to actually clone anything you have to specify the ‘clones => [“one”, …]’ parameter. Then it will clone, and add the token field as expected. Like this:

    Interestingly the “clones =>” parameter is optional, which just confuses the shit out of me.

    The reasoning that I don’t just add the field altogether is that this is the access token for our externally hosted ELK service. This should only be there for the external path, and not be put in S3 in parallel.

    References:
     
    • Lasitha Weerasinghe 13:51 on 2018-02-21 Permalink | Reply

      thanks mate.

  • penguin 16:09 on 2016-03-17 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ansible, ,   

    Ansible inventory file from Consul 

    Quick self-reminder:

     
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